Monthly Archives: February 2017

What Are the Side-Effects of Wisdom Teeth

There are numerous problems that can arise following the removal of wisdom teeth. A common complication is dry socket, an unpleasant problem that develops in the days after extraction. The cause of dry socket is when either the clot fails to form effectively around the wound, or the clot forms but is shed prematurely. Therefore the actual wound is ‘dry’. The bone is uncovered, which can result in a fair degree of pain.

“Wisdom Teeth”

Any dry socket commonly comes from the second day after wisdom teeth removal. The pain from it may spread out from the area and even to your ears. One can notice a bad taste in the mouth and also halitosis. Dry socket is a lot more likely to occur when you smoke within 24 hours of extraction, or if you do not keep to the after-care information your dental-care professional gives.

If you feel you do have the problem, go to your dentist. The socket has to be washed free of any kind of debris. The dentist will then administer some sort of dressing to alleviate your pain and reduce the inflammation in the socket.

Aside from dry socket, there are other possible complications from wisdom tooth extraction. These issues may include extended bleeding, some bruising and infection of the gum around the extraction site. Trauma to your neighboring teeth or alternatively teeth fillings can be a possibility, as is breaking of the roots of the wisdom tooth. If a root breaks, the remaining part of root might be either removed or if it is small it could be left in position. An infection from the bone tissue might set in, but this is rare within healthy people. You may experience some jaw pains and tightness also.

Other side effects might include: Nerve injury with resulting pins and needles around that region. This is a rare problem and usually a short-lived problem if it occurs. It can affect feeling through the lower lip and also chin. It could likewise affect taste and feeling from your tongue area. Another problem is jaw bone fracturing through the force applied when removing the tooth. This situation is extremely rare and in most cases only happens in elderly people, prone due to fragile bone and/or bone disease.

Even though long-term side effects are uncommon, you ought to be informed about the dangers. These dangers should be taken into consideration whenever the selection to remove wisdom teeth is made. You may be more prone to certain side-effects, for example neural damage, depending on exactly where a wisdom tooth lies.

To sum up, getting your wisdom teeth removed may include a fair level of minor surgery. As with just about any surgical procedure, there are certain possible complications. These include frequently encountered problems; for instance dry socket, bruising and/or tenderness. There are then the less likely side effects; for instance nerve damage. Your dentist or oral surgeon should tell you of the possibilities and discuss any of the side effects you’re specifically at risk of.

Health Issues Related to Wisdom

Between the ages of 17 and 25, the majority of people have their final set of molars appear, called wisdom teeth. The name stems from the fact that having these teeth come in later in life gives the person time to learn and gain experiences.

The wisdom teeth are the furthest back in a person’s mouth and also referred to as the third molars. Usually a person has four of them; however there can be fewer or none at all.

There is usually not enough room for the wisdom teeth in a person’s mouth. They can be misaligned or not come in at all, so removal of these teeth is typically required.

If these molars are positioned incorrectly or angled improperly, they can squeeze other teeth out of place or cause damage to the other teeth, the jaw bone or nerves. By crowding adjacent teeth, there can be a higher risk of trapping plaque and greater susceptibility to decay.

If the wisdom teeth do not fully erupt, but are present and caught in the soft tissue under the gums or jawbone, they are considered “impacted”. If they are not removed, infection and abbesses can occur, as well as pain, stiffness in the jaw, swelling and general malaise and illness.

Due to the location of the wisdom teeth in a person’s mouth, they can be difficult to clean. If there is an issue with eruption and the teeth are partially covered, they can be at risk of debris accumulating and are at risk of possible infection occurring.

If the gum bed extends over the top of the wisdom tooth and forms a partial cover, it is called an operculum. Due to the challenge with cleaning these teeth, which are exacerbated by this situation, a needless syringe may be required to pressure wash the area in an attempt to remove any trapped particles and plaque.

When the operculum does not disappear or if the wisdom teeth do not come in straight, and are caught in an angle under the gum line, extraction is the solution. If a horizontal impaction is left intact, growing ninety degrees forwards, the tooth can grow into the roots of the second molars.

The most common situation is when the wisdom teeth are angled forwards, towards the front of the mouth, called a mesioangular impaction. If this is the case, the teeth located on the lower row, on the mandible, are easier to remove.

The maxilla holds the top teeth which are the easiest to remove if the wisdom teeth are angled backwards. This is called a distoangular impaction, and is a much rarer occurrence.

Symptoms such as redness, pain, and swelling, difficulty opening the jaw, bad odour, or general illness attributed to your wisdom teeth can progress into severe infection if left untreated. If you are suffering any of these warning signs, contact your dentist or health care provider to find the root cause.

All About Wisdom Teeth

Wisdom teeth are the third and usually final set of molar teeth that most people get when they are age 14 and above – often in their late teens and early twenties. A small percentage of people, however, never get their wisdom teeth, and an even smaller percentage get extra wisdom teeth, called supernumerary teeth.

Wisdom teeth are the teeth farthest back in the mouth, and they are problematic because about 70% of the population do not have adequate room for them to erupt. And because of this, they produce congestion as well as irritation, inflammation and possible infection in the back of the mouth, both the upper and lower areas.

Is Removal Always Necessary?

This is not to say, however, that everyone needs their wisdom teeth removed. About 30% of the population will not need their removal if they keep their teeth clean and healthy. It’s easily determined by a dentist as early as the age of 14 if wisdom tooth extraction will be required.

An impacted wisdom tooth is one that has not emerged into its expected position. It is a tooth that is jammed in place, either against an adjacent front tooth, or because of the way it is lying in the bone, in a direction that will not permit eruption.

Reasons for impacted teeth vary but usually the cause is because there simply is not enough room in the individual’s mouth, or not enough jawbone space behind their second molar. Some people hypothesize that centuries ago mankind had a harder diet, making us chew more, which could have stimulated more growth in the jawbone.

Types of Impaction

You can have a bony impaction, a horizontal impaction, a diagonal impaction, or a soft tissue impaction, which primarily is at the corner of the back of the mouth. That is where there is an impingement of soft tissue where the tooth is almost covered by it and cannot erupt due to lack of space.

It’s important to have your wisdom teeth removed if the dentist deems it necessary to keep the rest of your teeth as straight as possible, among other reasons. If you or your child has wisdom teeth which you think may be a problem, see your dentist right away. It’s also a good idea to ask your dentist about wisdom teeth at your next regular dental check-up, even if you are unaware of their existence. They might be impacted and cause problems in future.

Managing Post Operational Wisdom

One common fear shared by adults is tooth extraction to relieve wisdom teeth pain. The pain of surgery could bring out anxiety which prevents suffers to avoid surgery. Knowing the truth about encompassing wisdom teeth extraction and its after care can somehow lessen the worry.

It is important that you be familiar with the root cause of the pain. Pain may emerge from wisdom teeth eruption which can also lead to tooth decay which is another cause of pain.

Wisdom teeth or the last set of grinding molars initiates eruption at ages 17 to 21 years old, but not all four back molars successfully break through the gums. Some of these may partially erupt or stay underneath the gums. While other wisdom teeth grow at a rapid rate but crowd adjacent teeth because of deficient gum space. The end point of these wisdom teeth eruptions would all go down to pain, swelling, irritation or worst, tooth decay. Nevertheless, all of these would require teeth surgery to alleviate pain.

Surgery is painless because anesthesia is given by the dentist or dental surgeon depending on the number of teeth to be removed. Single removal may call for local anesthesia while massive removal qualifies for general anesthesia.

The procedure of wisdom teeth extraction is quite simple. Once the anesthesia takes effect, the surgeon starts to create the incision on the affected gum then continues removing the bony covering of the teeth to easily extract the wisdom teeth. Other cases require drilling to completely remove teeth.

Aftermath pain is another story. Pain starts when anesthesia loses the effect. Common manifestations during post operation is pain, swelling of the face and jaw stiffness of the affected portion. It becomes imperative for a client to know certain facts after surgery to anticipate management.

Bleeding for 24 hours is common following teeth extraction. Reduce and control bleeding by placing gauze into your mouth over incisions. A moistened teabag is also an option to consider. If bleeding is persistent, apply ice chips that will help in hemostasis (blood clotting). Remember that frequent swallowing of blood results in black stools.

Facial swelling is normal right after the procedure; manage it by applying ice pack on the affected face. Brushing slowly with a soft-bristled toothbrush and avoiding the incision site to avoid trauma should be kept in mind. Another thing that should be avoided is sucking, spitting and intake of warm beverages. This results to dislodgement of the clot protecting the incision leading to dry sockets.

Maintain liquid diet prescribed by the dentist and avoid skipping or missing antibiotics and anti-inflammatory medications to achieve full healing. Conservative techniques could also be used to treat post pain. Peppermint application on affected gum daily for 15-20 minutes provides relief. Another is swishing warm salt water to reduce the number of bacteria inside the mouth. Then massage gum area to increase blood circulation. Acupressure to fight teeth pain is possible when done properly. Do this on the webbed area between the thumb and the index finger.

Remedies to treat pain after surgery may range scientific and conventional techniques. The choice choose to do any of it depending on your preference as long as the sole end point of this is healthy healing. Aftercare stands integral to successfully rule out bothersome wisdom teeth pain.